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Accueil > BIBLIOTHEQUE > Collections > Collections anglo-saxones > Handbook of Oriental Studies (Brill) > A Comparative Lexical Study of Qur’ānic Arabic (Martin R. ZAMMIT)

A Comparative Lexical Study of Qur’ānic Arabic (Martin R. ZAMMIT)

ZAMMIT (Martin R.), A Comparative Lexical Study of Qur’ānic Arabic, Leiden, Brill, ("Handbook of Oriental Studies. Section 1 The Near and Middle East ; 61"), 2002, xiv+658 p. ISBN 90 04 118012.

L’auteur

Martin R. Zammit, Ph.D. (1998), in Arabic and Semitic Studies, University of Malta, is a Lecturer of Arabic at the Department of Arabic and Near Eastern Studies, University of Malta.

Presentation

This work does not aim to be an etymological dictionary of Qur’ānic Arabic, nor does it attempt to suggest some new genetic classification of the Semitic languages. Rather, it offers insights into the internal lexical relationships attested in a number of Semitic varieties.
The work is based on a quantitative analysis of a substantial corpus of the Arabic lexicon with a view to investigating lexical relationships within a number of Semitic languages. Qur’ānic Arabic is the source of a lexical mass comparison exercise involving Akkadian, Ugaritic, Aramaic, Syriac, Hebrew, Phoenician, Epigraphic South Arabian and Ge‘ez.
Moreover, the lexical links identified in this study are in themselves linguistic indicators of the various degrees of cultural proximity characterising the various Semitic languages.

Table des matières

The book is made up of six chapters :
- Chapter One offers a brief overview about Semitic comparative lexical studies, whereas
- Chapter two discusses the emergence of Qur’anic Arabic.
- Chapter Three presents the lexical data, with Qur’anic Arabic at the basis of a lexical mass comparison exercise involving Akkadian, Ugaritic, Phoenician, Hebrew, Aramaic, Syriac, Ge’ez and Epigraphic South Arabian. This data is then discussed from the semantic point of view in
- Chapter Four : This data is then discussed from the semantic point of view in
- Chapter Five tackles the statistical data accruing from the lexical corpus, whereas
- Chapter Six offers the final observations and conclusions. This research does not aim to be an etymological dictionary of Qur’anic Arabic, nor does it attempt to suggest some new genetic classification of the Semitic languages. However, the lexical links identified in this study are in themselves linguistic indicators of the various degrees of cultural proximity characterizing the Semitic languages.

A Comparative Lexical Study of Qur’anic Arabic provides valuable research material to all those interested in Semitic studies in general or in any of the Semitic languages mentioned above in particular.

(Source : Brill)

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